Category Archives: Tipping Point

Inspiration and Beuys’ Acorns

Last summer I spent an afternoon in the Surrey home of the artist duo Ackroyd and Harvey, Heather Ackroyd and Dan Harvey. Our wide ranging conversation included discussions about their contributions to climate change art exhibitions, Earth Art of a Changing World  at the Royal Academy and PLATFORM’s C Words at the Arnolfini in Bristol, both held in late 2009. Heather and Dan have long been interested in the intersections between art and science and art and politics and have been vanguards among UK artists concerned with climate change. They are both alums of various Cape Farewell expeditions and Heather is a trustee of Tipping Point.

Dan and Heather infront of their grass wall in their front room

Their piece, Beuys’ Acorns is an ongoing project in which they collected hundreds of acorns, fallen to the ground from the original trees planted starting in 1982 in Kassel for Beuys’ project 7000 Oaks conceived for the art fair Documenta 7.They’ve subsequently planted the acorns and the sapling trees compose the work of art.  The work was shown as part of the Royal Academy Earth: Art of a Changing World exhibition in 2009-10. The exhibition serves as one of my case studies for my PhD research and it was for this reason I discussed the piece with Heather and Dan. In the following excerpt from our conversation, Heather and Dan explain various points of the piece’s genesis, which illuminates the tangled nature of the artistic process itself.

During our discussion, Heather attempted to unpick their original inspiration for Beuys’ acorns which was first shown at the Cube in Manchester as part of the Futuresonic Festival.  Heather says, ‘That piece of work was very much provoked I think from our participation in Tipping Point at Oxford… (although)… it’s quite difficult to disentangle how ideas evolve because they tend to be quite sticky and they tend to attach to a lot of different things that are wandering around in your head’.

Also, as part of the Manchester Festival, Heather had given a talk defending the position that art and politics cannot be separated along with the bigger question ‘can artists make a difference?’ which led them to consider the work of Joseph Beuys. The artists’ encounter with his work is longstanding. Dan recalled seeing a show of his in Venice over twenty years ago.  Heather also had a long acquaintance with Beuys’ work.  She told of dating a student in college who was ‘completely into Beuys’ and ‘he slept for two nights in the old pig pen- he was trying to re-enact a version of Beuys with his coyote.’ So for Heather, her awareness of Beuys comes from a rather ‘formative stage’, but according to her, ‘never really arrived fully feathered into my consciousness until four years ago.’  She goes on to say ‘what is delightful about the artistic process is that it’s never particularly linear, there are things that come out in quite a lateral way’.

This thought leads her to retell the influence of a book which was given to her as a gift from a friend with whom she was staying with in Tuscany.  ‘We had been to stay with some friends in Tuscany and they have a very beautiful olive grove that they’ve regenerated from a disused briar patch and they have lots of oak trees and Kathryn gave me two things as I left. She said ‘here’s some acorns and here’s this book that you have to read by Jean Giono called ‘The Man Who Planted Trees’.’ And on the train journey on the way back, I read the book. I thought it’s such a wonderful fable and it was really quite provocative. But what really seized my imagination was the afterward which was written by Jean Giono’s daughter.  He was commissioned by Readers Digest in America to write a piece about a character who was a local hero.  He was a fiction writer and wrote this fantastic story, sent it off to Readers Digest who said, fantastic, we really enjoy it. Readers Digest were following through all the various facts because I think every other author had given a real story and they came back to him and said ‘I can’t find any account of this guy’, and he said ‘well, you won’t, he doesn’t exist, he’s a figment of my imagination’. And they were really offended, they said ‘well what are you doing, you know you can’t do that.’ He said ‘I’m a writer, I write’. And they said they wanted it to be somebody real. Apparently it was a family joke and they all laughed mightily hard about it over their petit dejeuner in the morning. So he basically had this story and it didn’t see the light of day until he was approached by a German publishing house who said we’d like to publish some of your work, and he thought well I’ll give them this story, so he sent them this story and they published it. That was in the seventies and apparently it just caught off like wildfire and when I read that, in this little book. This is Jean Giono’s daughter, recounting this, it clicked. I thought, of course, that inspired Joseph Beuys’ 7000 Oaks. It just sort of became absolutely clear and at that point I said, ‘we’ve got to go and collect the acorns. We have to go and collect his acorns’. And that’s how it came about. We did more research into Joseph Beuys and his involvement in the German Green Party and his involvement just in terms of the way he spoke about the environment. So that was a real kind of epiphany, through reading that. So actually the divining moment came through a piece of literature. It’s fantastic. In fact that book has probably led to a huge amount of trees being planted worldwide. People turn around and say art doesn’t make a difference, and I say one hundred percent wrong, art can make a huge difference.’

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Climate Change, Contemporary Art, Exhibitions, Tipping Point

Is climate change a zombie concept?

Kellie Payne reports on the Tipping Point event, held in April, where Mike Hulme suggested climate change was a zombie concept: as a metaphor it has done its work. As a concept, it connects a large swathe of issues combined through the scientific narrative and perhaps there are other ways to make progress.

Much less the as-billed scientific update, the Tipping Point event held on Wednesday 13th April at Kings College, London was a philosophical exploration of the status of our current conceptualisation of climate change.

Hosted by Tipping Point, the arts organisation that seeks to build bridges between artists and climate scientists, the afternoon featured Mike Hulme, UEA climate scientist and author of Why We Disagree About Climate Change, climate change adaptation specialist Emma Tompkins and Greenpeace’s Senior Climate Advisor Charlie Kronick . In attendance were past Tipping Point conference attendees, a mix of artists, academics and a few scientists.

Hulme is a veteran climate scientist whose career has included serving as the founder-director of the Tyndall centre and contributing scientist to UK climate change scenarios and reports for the IPCC. However, writing his recent book led Hulme to take a more philosophical perspective: his interest being more in the positioning of our larger conceptualisations of climate change and interrogating different epistemological constructions of climate change. Moving beyond the merely scientific understanding of climate change, he investigates how climate change is understood in disciplines varying from economics, ethics, politics and humanities. In particular, he argues that climate change is a value laden concept that reflects our views of the world, nature, the economy and ethical frameworks.

Hulme’s presentation was largely an explanation of the four myths he explores in his book: lamenting Eden which draws on a sense of nostalgia, presaging apocalypse based on a sense of fear, constructing Babel (hubris) and celebrating jubilee which builds upon our sense of justice. In essence, what Hulme argues is that every individual brings their own agenda, applying the challenge of climate change to their own problems, that is, climate change is the raw material that is used to work on our individual projects. Hulme suggested we ask ourselves whether stabilising the climate was indeed our ultimate goal or whether stabilising climate was instead a means to an end, and we were using climate change to achieve our other goals.

Emma Tomkins on the other hand bases her work on a belief that climate change is happening and asserts that the government is leading the way on adaptation. Based at Leeds and the Government’s Department for International Development, Tomkins outlined types of adaptation currently being implemented including risk management policies and attempts to build resilience. When Tomkins asked the audience how many were currently taking adaptive measures, it became clear that the line between what constitutes mitigation activities and adaption is often blurred in the minds of many. The government makes a clear distinction between mitigation measures (limiting ones emissions) and adaption (preparing for the impacts of climate change). For instance when asked about what types of adaptation individuals were taking, some audience members mentioned the work of the Transition Town movements, but from the government perspective Transition Town activities would constitute mitigation measures as their main focus is reducing emissions.

Tomkins conducted an exercise to see how we as an audience would allocate adaptation funds, whether we would base our decisions on: equitable distribution of resources, reward mitigators, help those facing the most exposure, help the most vulnerable, or offer developmental assistance. At the moment, current government policy (Adaptation Policy Framework) is based on risk mapping and awareness and therefore has its focus on those who face the most exposure to risk. Tomkins stressed the need to be aware that in any adaptation policy there are a number of decisions to be made about the type of losses we are willing to take and warned that there is a potential to make serious mistakes unless we seriously consider the issues.

Charlie Kronick weighed in with the activist viewpoint, reminding the audience that in the past adaptation wasn’t even considered because to do so would be to accept defeat. Further, he didn’t see the need to separate out adaptation and mitigation as he sees them as one and the same. For Charlie, climate change isn’t about science, or art, but about power politics, ‘the deal makers and takers’ and inequality is a major driver.

Hulme agreed that it’s about politics and our ambitions about what type of society we want to inherit. Hulme suggested that perhaps climate change was indeed a zombie concept, and as a metaphor it has done its work. As a concept, it connects a large swathe of issues combined through the scientific narrative and perhaps there are other ways to make progress.

This piece was previously published as a guest blog post on Ashdenizen (http://ashdenizen.blogspot.com/2010/04/is-climate-change-zombie-concept.html?showComment=1272626495068).

Leave a comment

Filed under Climate Change, Mike Hulme, Science, Tipping Point, Transition Towns